Category: Articles

Swimming Schools Near You – Bryanston

Having trouble finding swimming schools in your area? Look no further – a list of all the swimming schools in the Bryanston Area.

 

Name Address Area Contact
Zogs Swim School 1 Banbury Street Bryanston 0823346973
BSwimSafe 27 Chesterfield Road Bryanston 0836499067
Little Fishes Swimming School Bantry Road Bryanston 0114638389
Quick Strokes Swimming Pool 256 Bryanston Drive Bryanston 0824861983
Goof Swim School 115 St Audley Road Bryanston 0118078027 or

0844109242

Free Style Swimming 165 Bryanston Drive Bryanston 0832532998

 

Water Games To Play With Your Child

We have the following suggestions to help your little one get used to water:

  1. From an early age, pour or trickle water over his head and wet his eyes with a small cup, bucket, wet face cloth or sponge.
  2.  Never wipe his eyes to dry them and teach him from an early age to blink when he has water in his eyes.
  3. Blowing bubbles in the bath is fun. As he gets older, he can practice blowing through a straw. Blowing bubbles is essential for breathing during swimming.
  4. Floating toys in the pool is a great way to get him to move his arms and legs to get the toy.
  5. The ideal way to hold your baby in the pool is to hold him with your thumbs on his shoulder blades, ensuring that his chin is touching the water but making sure his mouth isn’t submerged so he doesn’t swallow water.
  6. From an early age, get him to jump to you in the water from a step or the side of the pool. Make sure you always catch him as he lands in the water (and not in the air).

By: Britt – Living and Loving.

Read more at: https://www.livingandloving.co.za/baby-blog/baby-general-articles/baby-swimming-lessons-everything-you-need-to-know

Teaching Your Baby to Swim

By: Dean Beaumont

Teaching your baby to swim can be incredibly rewarding: not only are you boosting their confidence, it’s great exercise, supports a healthy lifestyle, and it’s also one of the best ways of spending some fun, quality time together.

When your child’s older, you might sign him up for swimming lessons, but there’s plenty you can do to build your baby’s confidence in the water from day one.

START SMALL

 There are lots of ways you can get your baby used to water at home, long before you first introduce him to your local swimming pool.

This can start from baby’s first bath. You could

  • Splash water gently over his body.
  • Lay him on his back and move him gently through the water.
  • Over the next few months, get him used to having water on his face by gently squeezing a sponge of water over it.

Jane Saddington of the Amateur Swimming Association (ASA) recommends using cue words. She says:

“Try saying, ‘one, two, three, go!’ when you put water on his face. Babies have a reflex action, so he automatically holds his breath when water hits his face. In the future, you can use those words to help him hold his breath underwater.”

When you move your baby to a big bath, use enough water so he can float. Support him on his front and back, and very gently manipulate his arms and legs in a swimming motion.

Hanging out with a newborn

THE FIRST TRIP TO THE POOL

Before your first trip to the pool, you’ll need to take:

Towels for you both – a hooded towel for them to help keep them warm after getting out the pool can be handy

  • Swimming nappies – these come in both reusable and disposable varieties, so you can pick what suits your family
  • A swimming costume for them – babies can get cold in the pool which can affect their mood, so insulated bodysuits can be a good idea
  • If your little one is weaned, take a snack with you, as swimming can them hungry
  • If your baby is bottle fed, you may want to take a bottle with you, but most swimming lessons are only around 30 minutes, so even if your baby is breastfed this doesn’t mean it is impossible to take them out. Of course, mum may also want to come and either join in or sit and watch you have some quality time too!

Life skills to teach your kids

HOW TO START

When your baby’s ready for his first dip, Jane Saddington suggests carrying on where you left off in the bath:

“Move him around the pool so he experiences the water on his skin. Support him on his front and back and simulate kicking, which babies naturally do as a butterfly kick, with both legs.”

  • Also let your baby splash and play with his bath toys – throw one a few feet away and zoom him through the water to retrieve it.
  • Put your mouth under water and show your baby how to blow bubbles – this is important for him to learn, as he can’t inhale when he’s blowing.

Play time

LESSON TIME

There is a wide variety of parent and baby swimming classes which are now available around the UK. There is not a lower age limit for when a baby can go swimming, but check with your local swimming school in case they do have their own rules.

“Water confidence classes are a great way of getting kids used to the water – there are games, toys and music, which they love,” says Jane.

The most important thing is to make swimming fun, so your baby learns through play.

During the adult and child lessons your child will learn the basics, such as jumping into the pool, kicking his legs while holding the side, and holding his breath for short periods underwater.

The 6 Stages of Childhood Swimming Lessons

by: Premier Aquatic Services

Image result for child swimming lessons

Each child learns to swim at his or her own pace, and in order to develop a lifelong love of the water, that natural pace should be respected and nurtured. Therefore, we developed a six-stage program for our childhood swim lessons, built around skill-oriented goals.

Simply put, each little swimmer must master specific skills before progressing on to the next level, regardless of the child’s age.

Level 1 – Jellyfish

Developed for those who are brand new to swimming, the first level of swim lessons are perfect for those who have no prior experience. In this class, children learn to hold their breath and put their faces in the water. They also develop a bond with and trust for their instructor, as they build the courage to jump from the stairs to their instructor.

Level 2 – Tadpole

Progressing from the Jellyfish stage, children in this level are already proficient in holding their breath and putting their faces in the water. Now, they begin to learn how to float, fetch toys underwater, and perform basic strokes with the help of their instructor. In this stage, they grasp rhythmic breathing and explore the freestyle stroke.

Level 3 – Minnow

To advance into the Minnow stage, children are able to float unassisted for up to five seconds, retrieve toys in four feet of water, and perform assisted back floats. Level 3 classes teach them how to float on their back without assistance, move independently from the front floating position to a back float position, and kick in streamline for 15 feet. Additionally, children further develop their freestyle stroke by beginning to learn how to side breath with assistance from the instructor.

Level 4 – Guppy

Already able to float on their backs, transition from front floats to back floats, and perform assisted side breathing, Level 4 classes progress children’s strength and technique. Here, children begin to kick in streamline on their front and back. They develop their backstroke and learn to swim freestyle with unassisted side breathing. Additionally, they start developing diving skills by performing sit dives.

Level 5 – Lionfish

Students entering the Lionfish classes are moving through the water unassisted with skill. Now, they begin to learn new techniques, including the breaststroke and butterfly kick. They also graduate from sit dives to knee dives.

Level 6 – Dolphin

The final stage before “Pre Team” levels, children finalize the development of their core swimming skills. In the Level 6 class, they become proficient at all four competitive strokes – freestyle, backstroke, breaststroke, and butterfly. Additionally, they learn to become comfortable with deck dives

7 Ways to Keep Your Kids Safe on the Beach This Summer

THINKSTOCK IMAGES VIA GETTY IMAGES

Allow me to tell you about the angriest I’ve ever been in my life. I was a lifeguard in Long Beach, NY and the ocean was particularly rough on this day. (I know you’re thinking, But it’s NY! How rough can the ocean really get there?? Well, click on this link to have a look. http://youtu.be/PiPNAeo-174 That’s about 100 yards from the spot I worked, so lesson one is don’t underestimate any body of water you plan on entering.)

On this particular day I had a rescue when a riptide eroded a sandbar that a large group of people had gathered on. Almost everyone made it to the shore on their own except for the two small children I pulled out. They were brother and sister. He was 8 or 9 and she was maybe 11. When I returned them to land, I had expected to see mom or dad waiting to hug them; relieved that their children were safe. They weren’t there. As a matter of fact, I had the kids take me all the way to the back of the beach where I found the mom sleeping… with headphones on! She was completely oblivious to the fact that she had almost lost both of her children while she worked on her tan. Please don’t think I’m exaggerating. Her kids were at the very end of their struggle to stay afloat when I got to them. They were going to die. I was furious at this person for being so careless when it came to the safety of her kids and I made sure that she knew it.

When you go to the beach (or anywhere) with your kids, YOU are the first and most important line of defense when it comes to their safety. Gone are the days when the beach meant that you can sit in a chair and read a book, or take a nice nap in the sun. You now have to be constantly on guard. If your child is near the water, you need to be near the water too. If your child is in the water, you should be ankle-deep right behind them at the absolute minimum. You’d be shocked at how quickly a small child can go from wetting his or her toes to being knocked over and washed out with a surprise wave. A 10-second glance away could be all it takes. Consider the lifeguards a final option when all you have done to keep them safe has failed. Do not rely on them or anyone else when it comes to the safety of your kiddos.

Here is a list of things to run through before you head to big blue with the kids:

1. Know your swimming limitations

Please take note that I’m not saying “DISCOVER your limitations.” If you think the water might be too rough for you, then I assure you that you are right. Err on the side of caution always. Don’t put yourself into a dangerous situation, especially when you are with your kids.

2. Be especially cautious in unfamiliar waters

By most standards, I am an excellent swimmer. However, new bodies of water present new challenges that I might not know about and don’t want to discover when I’m in it. Always investigate the place you’re entering first. Ask locals, scope out potential problems and stay out if you’re unsure. If it’s a hot day and you see a delightful-looking area of water that is free of other swimmers, assume there is a reason for it. There might be a riptide, polluted waters or it might be off-limits for some other reason you are not aware of.

3. Recognize a Riptide

Riptides (sometimes called “undertows”) are channels of water that flow from the beach out to sea. You have all of these waves coming in and they have to go back out to sea somewhere. The water is pushed to the side by the waves that are behind it until it finds an exit. This is usually in a spot that’s deeper than the surrounding areas and when the water rushes out, it forms a channel and makes it even deeper. Take a second to watch the water before you go in. Is there a section of the beach where the waves just aren’t breaking? Does the whitewater that’s rolling in mysteriously disappear in a section? That is the deeper water. Waves break where the water gets shallow. If they aren’t breaking, it’s deeper there and you should move your kids somewhere well away from it because chances are, that’s the spot that’s pulling out to sea. What looks to you like the most serene patch of water can very well be the most dangerous. Also, don’t swim very close to jetties or piers. Riptides often form next to them as water is forced out to sea.

4. Know how to get out of a riptide

Riptides can be very scary if you’re in one. You swim and swim and swim towards shore, but either make no progress, or get farther and farther away. If you’ve never been in a riptide, imagine swimming to the end riptide-diagramof your pool, only you’re swimming uphill and the water is pushing you back. There is a very simple solution to this. Swim parallel to the shore, not towards it. The riptide might only be a few yards wide. Once you’re out of it, getting to shore will be relatively easy again.

5. Talk to the lifeguards before you go in

This is a surprisingly simple thing to do that most people overlook. You might be looking at the lifeguard and think to yourself, Pffff… That kid is 19 years old, tops. What can he/she tell me that I don’t already know… Well, when it comes to the ocean, I guarantee you that they know more than you might ever know. In one summer, it’s very likely that those “kids” will spend more time on the beach and in the ocean than most people will in their entire lives. They are the experts and you should respect that. Ask them where the safest place is for you and the kids. Have them point out dangerous spots (they’ll know where they are and where they form with changing tides). If you’re not a strong swimmer, let them know and ask them to keep a particular eye out for your children. I promise you that if you show them that you are making an effort, they will make an effort for you as well.

6. Recognize when someone is in trouble

I strongly recommend that everyone read this article and share it with everyone you know. “Drowning Doesn’t Look Like Drowning”http://mariovittone.com/2010/05/154/. It gives you a very real description of what to look for and recognize when someone is in desperate need of help. They cannot call out, they cannot scream. They simply go under. I’ll leave this quote from it here: “Children playing in the water make noise. When they get quiet, you get to them and find out why.”

7. Assign a guardian when you are away

There are obviously going to be times that you can’t watch the kids. You might have to go to the bathroom or feed a parking meter. A mistake that many people (especially those in groups) make is assuming someone else is watching the kids. They are there with eight other adults, so someone is looking out while you’re away, right?? The problem that arises is that every other parent is also assuming someone else has their eyes on your kids. When you need to leave, assign someone specific to watch your children. Tell them “You are in charge of them until I come back. DO NOT STOP WATCHING THEM UNTIL THEN.” Be firm about it. If you don’t give someone this responsibility, you can’t assume that someone is going to just naturally take over.

So please take caution this summer. Watch your kids at the beach, at the pool, heck, even near the mall fountain. Once you know what to look for and what to look out for, you can spend time on the beach passing that knowledge on to your children. They will be safe while you’re with them and armed with the lessons you give them, they’ll be safe in the future when they are on their own.

The benefits of swimming lessons

Taking your child to swimming lessons should not involve fuss or trauma if you find a good swimming school and a loving teacher.

In South Africa there are so many children who drown every year that every child must learn to swim as early as possible. Getting your child waterborne is a priority as it can save his life. Swimming also offers great physical and psychological rewards for all children and adults.

Water is a gentle, soothing, relaxing medium and the benefits gained from swimming improve mood, fitness and overall health and well-being. Other benefits of swimming include:

  • Swimming strengthens muscles and joints
  • It builds lung capacity – especially good for asthma sufferers
  • Increases fitness
  • Swimming encourages babies to start to cross their midline and to develop other physical skills
  • It improves co-ordination
  • Swimming builds tone in children – particularly good for those with low muscle tone
  • It improves balance
  • Swimming helps to heal Injuries – a soothing and weightless weight to work damaged or unused muscles
  • It allows children with disabilities to enjoy physical activity
  • It improves spatial awareness

Teach your child to swim without a fuss

  • Choose a swimming school or teacher with a relaxed and inviting atmosphere.
  • Make sure your child isn’t cold or uncomfortable in the water.
  • Try to ensure that the teacher and your child are well matched.
  • Try not to miss lessons as each lesson builds on the previous one and gives continuity.
  • Don’t push your child or permit a teacher to force your child to do things he doesn’t feel happy doing.
  • Get the whole family to paddle, swim and splash about in the water so your child gets to swim without the constraints of a swimming ‘lesson’.
  • Don’t stop lessons if your child becomes afraid of swimming. Rather, build his confidence by working through the fear and proving to him that he can overcome it.

How to choose a school
It’s often a good idea to ask other parents where they are taking their children to swimming lessons. You can also ask for recommendations at your child’s school or at your local gym. But you must be happy that there’s a caring and nurturing atmosphere at the school. If the general vibe is positive and other children are happy to swim there, it’s a good sign. Nevertheless, there are more formal and serious things that you must look for in a trustworthy swimming school:

  • The school must be accredited by Swimming South Africa (SSA).
  • The water must be clean and warm. There must also be signs up saying which end is deep and which shallow, unless it is a teaching pool of one depth only.
  • Children must have a way of supporting themselves around the edge of the pool. This also helps them move around the pool safely when they first learn to swim.
  • There must be nothing hazardous around the pool, such as pool chemicals within reach of children.
  • There must be clean, well-kept toilets and changing facilities at the pool.
  • When you register your child with the school, they must ask for all your relevant contact numbers.
  • If your child has any medical conditions, you must inform the school.
  • Above all, you and your child must feel relaxed and comfortable at the swimming school.

If you don’t have a swimming school in your area, you can now meet online with swimming teachers and other parents to discuss various aspects of your child’s swimming journey through www.swimsavvy.co.za

Swim Savvy also recently published their first in a series of interactive journals to support young children through their swimming journey. The Swim Savvy ‘I can swim’ Progress Journal for Beginner Swimmers is a great interactive book that includes water-safety guidelines. You can buy your copy for only R55 via their website.